from viridiandesign.org:
“According to the South Korean government’s six-year study of the ecosystem in the DMZ, the 250-km-long, 4-km-wide no-man’s land that separates heavily armed forces has been reconfirmed as housing some of the world’s rarest species of flora and fauna.

“Revealing its study conducted from 1995 until Feb. 6 of last year, the Korea Forest Research Institute (…) discovered about 100 rare, endangered and unrecorded species of plants, animals and microorganisms living in the 90,803 hectares of land that separate the two Koreas. Existing as a buffer zone between the two Koreas for half a century has enriched the DMZ’s ecosystem. (((Mostly this is through the useful fact that anybody walking around in the DMZ will be shot.)))


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DMZ’s rich ecosystem

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